Marantz MCR 610 – A Review

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As mentioned in my introduction to the review of the of the B&W 686 S2’s, a separate review of the  Marantz MCR651 would follow.

The Marantz unit was a replacement for the incredibly talented Yamaha A-S700 and CD-N500pairing that had served me well for around 12 months. There was nothing wrong with their performance – I simply had an itch to downsize my system and not sacrifice on sound quality.

When I was looking around at options under a budget of £500 there were a number of options from the likes of Teac, Onkyo, Yamaha and Denon to name but a few. Most of them had an iPod dock built into the top which, to me, made the system less appealing. I also wanted a CD Player built in which excluded a number of options.

The system that really caught my eye was the Marantz MCR 651. In terms of features it seemed to cater for virtually every eventuality (and more): CD, DAB, FM, Internet Radio, Wireless/Wired Network Streaming, Two Analogue inputs, Two sets of Speaker Outputs (for Bi-Amping as well as multiroom, optical digital input, Spotify and Last FM capabilities – the list went on.

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The dealer I discussed the unit with suggested that the performance of the CD Player and built in amp rivalled that of an entry level Marantz separates system and I was therefore intrigued as to how this box of tricks would perform and duly bought one.

Once I got the unit home I was truly surprised by how small it was. I set it up on a wooden unit and, at first, it looked truly lost.

I connected the speaker cables, ethernet cable and power chord and switched the unit on. I was stunned to find that within a few seconds it had synched with my home network and recognised my NAS drive. From the Marantz App I put in my user name and password for Spotify and I was good to go. It all seemed too straightforward.

As an aside I tried the Marantz in wireless mode and again all was good. It found the wifi signal with no problems and worked well.

So, 10 minutes after unboxing the MCR 610 I was listening to a Spotfy playlist and thoroughly enjoying the sound and convenience of having millions of songs at my fingertips.

I then access the music on my NAS drive and played some hi-res FLAC files. Again no problems. In fact all the functions on the unit worked flawlessly and I could not be happier with the performance.

I have read that it has a typical “Marantz” sound but having not owned any Marantz products previously I had nothing to compare it too.

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For a full description of the quality of the sound please look at my B&W 686 S2 review as my thoughts on sound quality are pretty much summed up there.

So all is great? Actually no. Here are the gripes:

· First of all the app is slow. Really slow. Whether it is selecting a new track or going between functions it seems to take an age. The Yamaha network player was far quicker as was the Squeezebox touch.

· And if it isn’t being slow the app crashes more than it should. Two or three times over a 2 hour period which I find unacceptable whilst using the app. If for some reason you come out of the app and restart it (especially when using a music server)  the music stops and you have to start again selecting the Marantz through the app and finding your music again. Very frustrating. To my mind Marantz need to put this at the top of their list to sort or it will put customers off.

Other than the above issues with software I am delighted with this little unit. Whether in the long run the app  drives me to distraction remains to be seen but for now I will simply enjoy it’s music making capabilities.

 

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Bowers and Wilkins 686 S2 – Small is Big

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I have long been a huge fan of standmount speakers and have owned and, or, reviewed speakers from mainstream companies such as Wharfedale, and Kef to more esoteric brands like Sonus Faber, Harbeth and Totem.

It was change again this last week with the at home with the Yamaha set up I have been enjoying thoroughly for the last 12 months being sold and shipped to pastures new for me to enter into the 21st Century with (takes a deep breath) a one box system from Marantz.

A Marantz MCR610 to be precise and this will be the subject of another review where I will cover off my findings with this little unit.

The subject of this review as the introduction alluded to is a pair of standmount speakers: the new B&W 686 S2’s.

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The motivation for getting these speakers was the same as purchasing the Marantz – to downsize the hi-fi system and try and replicate something that would cater for my audiophile sensibilities without dominating my lounge.

I auditioned a number of speakers and for one reason or another these were discounted due to the fact they didn’t have the musical balance or performance I was looking for. So what did I have on my wish list?

Basically, I was looking for a musical hybrid which would offer something close to the performance of two of my favourite speakers of all time – the midrange and vocal capabilities of the Harbeth P3ESR’s and soundstaging and the stupendous bass from a small box capabilities of the Totem Model One’s.

Oh, and all for less than £350. Or at a quarter of the price of the above two speakers.

A tall order and to be honest I was not holding out much hope of achieving anywhere near my goal.

As previously mentioned, I listened to a number of speakers and compared them to the existing Wharfedale Denton 80th Anniversary speakers at home including Dali’s Zensor 1 and 3’s, Monitor Audio’s BX2 and Q Acoustic’s 2020’s.

They all sounded fine – the Dali Zensor 3’s being the best of the bunch (albeit the biggest) – but were not as good as the Wharfedale never mind the Harbeth and Totem’s. I could never have lived with them over the longer term.

The dealer then suggested I push the budget slightly from the £200-£300 range to try the B&W 686’s S2’s. At just £50 more than the Dali Zensor 3’s I did not have much hope.

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These speakers are the latest incarnation of B&W’s entry level offering and have a number of changes from the previous model including improved tweeter, woofer and a smaller cabinet. Specifications taken from B&W website are:

Technical features: Decoupled Double Dome aluminium tweeter with Nautilus™ tube loading
Flowport™
Description 2-way vented-box system
Drive units 1x ø25mm (1 in) aluminium dome high-frequency
1x ø130mm (5 in) woven Kevlar® cone bass/midrange
Frequency range -6dB at 54Hz and 50kHz
Frequency response 62Hz – 22kHz ±3dB on reference axis
Dispersion Within 2dB of reference response
Horizontal: over 60º arc
Vertical: over 10º arc
Sensitivity (84)85dB spl (2.83V, 1m)
Harmonic distortion 2nd and 3rd harmonics (90dB, 1m)
<1% 110Hz – 22kHz
<0.5% 180Hz – 20kHz
Nominal impedance 8Ω (minimum 5.2Ω)
Crossover frequencies 4kHz
Recommended amplifier power 25W – 100W into 8Ω on unclipped programme
Max. recommended cable impedance 0.1Ω
Dimensions Height: 315mm (12.4 in)
Width: 160mm (6.3 in)
Depth: 229mm (9.0 in) cabinet, grille and terminals
Net weight 4.6kg (10.1 lb)
Finishes Black
White

The star of the above show is arguably the Decoupled Double Dome tweeter. Full technical details are on B&W’s website but it seems clear that the application of this technology works amazingly well.

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So how do they sound?

Set up on their dedicated stands in my lounge I connected them to the Marantz MCR610 one word truly sums them up: remarkable.

It is hard not to start each sentence with: for their size they are…… and then insert a description relating to an element of their performance which simply stuns you with it’s scale or clarity or soundstaging. Considering their diminutive stature they simply sound significantly bigger than they have a right to. My lounge is not exactly small (20ft by 13ft) yet the 686’s filled the room with music.

The way that they can three dimensionally portray a singer between the speakers is spooky. And there is height to the image which adds to the sense of realism. Turn the volume up and the image get’s bigger and bigger.

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I started my listening session in earnest once the speakers had been running for a few hours with one of my favourite test tracks that I have used dozens of times before: Broken Wings by Dougie MacLean from his Marching Mystery album. The track though the 686’s starts wonderfully with a fantastic ring and resonance to the acoustic guitar.

The bodrhan providing the beat, though, was the initial surprise. It was deep and authoritative and maintained it’s rhythm beautifully. The bass performance was easily the equal of the larger Wharfedale Denton’s.

The next surprise was when MacLean started singing. His vocals were startlingly real and set clearly and precisely in their own space. I was genuinely taken aback.

I tried track after track and the speakers simply disappeared leaving performers perfectly placed in my living room. From blues to classical and folk to heavy metal these speakers continued to astound.

Admittedly, they are unable to move air on rock tracks in the same was a bigger speaker can but the bass performance always carried a significant punch and stunning weight for the size of the speakers.

Suffice it to say that they totally fit the bill in terms of the original brief. Are they as good as the Harbeth’s? No, they lack a some of that’s speakers refinement and midrange warmth and they way the P3ESR’s portray vocals is uncanny in it’s realism – more so than the 686’s.

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If I had one slight criticism with the little B&W’s it would be that, just occasionally, the treble would stand out slightly but this was mainly at lower volumes. Not a problem in the slightest but a noticeable difference with comparing with the Harbeths.

But the Harbeth’s retail at nearly £1,500!

How about the Totems? These, to me, are the soundstage kings. Width, depth, height. They have it all. They are remarkable in terms of bass too (for their size!). But they have a new contender.

The 686 S2’s.

The only area (and to be honest this is more from memory from when I had them) is in terms of soundstage width where the Model One’s have the 686’s beaten. Having said that I have not played around with positioning too much and so I may be to gain improvements in this area with some experimentation.

So the bottom line is at £350 these speakers are bargains. I would put my money on them being able to compete with speakers several times their price and show them a clean pair of heels in many areas. I am not familiar with the previous models and so could not offer an opinion here.

I would have loved to have pushed the budget for the 685’s but it wasn’t to be so. I suspect they would be even better in my lounge but for now I will enjoy the 686’s thoroughly.

Art on Skye

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The Skye Arts Trail

Other than sheep, the Isle of Skye seems to have an abundance of talented artists, photographers, sculptures, potters and weavers.

The Skye and Lochalsh Arts and Crafts Association produce a wonderful book detailing galleries and studios throughout the Island, their location and the types of work on display.

We have used this guide over the past couple of years to visit many of these and of the 42 artists and galleries features in the guide we have visited or seen the work of over 30 and detail our highlights below:

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Skyescape Gallery

Skyescape Gallery is situated on the Harlosh Peninsular and features work predominantly by Russell Sherwood – owner and founder of the gallery – but also by a few other carefully selected photographers. We fell in love with Russell’s work the first time that we saw it being displayed in Dunvegan and had to make the trip to his gallery to see the quality of his other work which we found to be wonderful too. .

Russell is very welcoming and more than willing to impart advice and information on the equipment he uses and his workflow. He also offers tuition for a fee and although we have not used his services can only imagine that this is great value for money and worthwhile to employ his services.

Russell is a member of F4 – four likeminded photographers whose work is dominated by the landscape of Skye.

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Tim Wilcock Photography

Tim and his wife run the Grasmhor Bed and Breakfast near Dunvegan and in addition Tim is also a talented landscape photographer. Tim’s work can be seen at the bed and breakfast where he has a small gallery and like Russell Sherwood, is more than happy to discuss how and where he captures his images.

Tuition is also available which I can only imagine is superb and good humoured.

Tim is also a member of the F4 collective.

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Dandelion Designs and Images Gallery

This gallery is situated in the beautiful, small village of Stein on the Waternish peninsular next door to the Stein Inn – Skye’s oldest Inn.

It features the work of several artists – Liz, Pat and Cathy Myhill predominate but there is also work on display (and to buy) by John Viles and Marion McPhee to name but two. We were particularly struck by the work of Liz Myhill who produces some beautiful and arresting art.

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Ellishadder Art Café

One of our absolute favourites not just for the amazing food and drinks and service but also but the wonderful art work created by Stuart and Maggie Quigley the owners and operaters of the Café.

Stuart produces some stunning paintinsg and pencil drawings of Skye and Maggie weaves amazing rugs which are works of art in themselves.

Again, as we have found with most artists on the Island they are more than happy to discuss how they create their work and it really hits home how much work actually goes into their creations.

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Skyeline Ceramics

Skyeline Ceramics is situated in a very small workshop in Broadford. The workshop is renowed for the exquisitely crafted sculptures of sheep. The attention to detail is amazing and each of the small creations is unique giving them their own personality.

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John Bathgate – Dun Studio

John Bathgate’s studio is just outside of the town of Dunvegan and is a treasure trove of beautifully painted scenes of Skye. John is great company and, like most artists on Skye is happy to share his inspirations.

John uses various media including acrylics, oil, mixed media and collage to capture the atmosphere and grandeur of Skye’s landscape. His work is available in original form and limited edition prints.

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Alan Campbell

Alan is an incredibly gifted photographer based in Broadford. He exclusively uses medium format film to capture both dramatic and atmospheric images.

When you look has his work you appreciate the increased dynamic range and wonderful colour that it seems only film can capture.

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Nigel Grounds Gallery

Using bold, dramatic colours Nigel’s paintings are stunning in the way they capture Skye’s landscape. His gallery is probably the first you will encounter after leaving the Mallaig to Armadale ferry – it is literally 100 metres on the right hand side as you head towards the main road.

Nigel regularly exhibits his work in galleries across Scotland.

These are just a handful of the artists and photographers we have visited and our favourites so far. There are many to discover and we look forward to doing this on our future visits to Skye.

Links:

http://skyescapegallery.zenfolio.com/
http://www.timwilcock.com/
http://www.dandelion-designs.co.uk/
http://www.ellishadderartcafe.co.uk/
http://www.skyelineceramics.com/
http://www.dunstudio.com/
http://alan-campbell.com/
http://www.nigelgrounds.co.uk/

It’s life Jim but not as we know it………

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So, following on from the initial Blog post…….

I returned home after work on a Friday afternoon to find a large box with Wharfedale and 80th Anniversary emblazoned on the side. The Denton’s had arrived.

I was naturally, eager to set them up and within no time at all had them had them connected to the new Yamaha A-S700 amplifier (where’s the Rega you may ask – that may be the subject of a separate post!).

But to back track I must mention the packaging. This is superb. The speakers were packed in their own cotton bag which was in turn packaged in heavy duty plastic bags. They were nestled firmly in Styrofoam inside a very well made cardboard box. There was also a plastic wallet in the box which contained a pair of cotton gloves, manual and a booklet detailing the history of Wharfedale. It may not sound like much but the way that a company cares for their products says a lot about their quality.

And in terms of build quality I was not disappointed. Every element from the veneer, to the binding posts and the way the 80th anniversary stickers are applied to the rear of the speakers oozed quality. They feel solid and have a reassuring heft to them. Very impressive.

And, so it was with hopes raised that I switched on the amplifier and started to put the speakers through their paces with some tracks that I am very familiar with. I didn’t have the Harbeth’s on hand for a direct comparison but their sound signature is so unmistakable to me differences in sound quality and presentation are straightforward to evaluate.

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The first song that I listened to was Broken Wings by Dougie Maclean from his Marching Mystery album. I must have listened to this song a hundred times or more over the years and never tire of it.

It is a simple track dominated by a bodrhan, acoustic guitar and Dougie Maclean’s voice. Even the most straightforward of tracks are easy to get wrong on some systems and this one is no exception.

Each of the instruments has their own part to play in moving the track forward. If the rhythmic, almost hypnotic drumming of the bodrhan becomes overblown or lost in the mix it loses it’s ability to act as the drive behind the song. The acoustic guitar needs to be clear and resonant, the chords should stand out from the mix with Dougie’s voice sounding plaintive with the burr of his beautiful Scottish accent coming through.

Needless to say the Harbeth’s get all of these elements to me perfectly balanced. The Denton’s offer a slightly different version of the truth so to speak. The first thing I noticed was that the bass response was deeper but this should be expected as the this is a ported design with a slightly bigger cabinet and bass driver.

The Bodrahn seemed bigger with more of a bass thud. It was also slightly “muddier” if that is a decent term to use and lost a little of it’s rhythm.

The acoustic guitar sounded warmer too with slightly less ring and resonance to the strings than I am used to. The Harbeths seem to hold onto the notes a little longer and the guitar comes across a little smaller but more akin to how a real acoustic guitar would sound. The Dentons offered a presentation where the guitar sounds slightly larger than life.

And so to the vocals. They came across with the Dentons as slightly more recessed. They didn’t get lost in the mix as I have heard them on some speakers but Dougie’s diction was slightly less clear. Not unpleasant. Just not as real as through the P3ESRs.

Denton rear

There’s a couple of things with the above – firstly I am comparing a speaker in the Denton’s that is a third of the price of the Harbeth’s. I am also comparing a “home” speaker with one that is essentially a “domesticated” studio monitor speaker which has to sound clear, precise and totally natural or it would be missing the designer’s brief by a wide margin.

Taken in isolation away from the “studio” presentation of the Harbeth and for the money the Dentons sound superb and are a wonderful loudspeaker.

I have tried them out on a wide range of material and at no time did they offend. They presentation of music is warm and graceful allowing the message of the music to come through.

Are they as good as the Harbeths? No – the Harbeth’s are significantly better and I cannot wait to be in a position to get my hands back on a pair of the P3ESRS. For other people though they could be just what they are looking for as you can listen to music for hours with no fatigue or irritation. If you listen to rock music then I would steer clear of them but then again I would say the same with the Harbeth’s.

To me the Harbeth’s present the truth albeit a smaller scale version. The Dentons are slightly bigger and warmer version of that truth that I can live with and not be constantly looking over my shoulder to a time when the Harbeth’s were in place which, to be honest, I never thought I would find at this price level. Throw in the fact that they are beautifully veneered and made and you have a speaker that you would struggle to significantly better for less than £1,000.

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One Camera, One Lens – The Evolution

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Canon 5D and 24-105L

Around three years ago I lugged with me the following whenever I went on a day trip or vacation with the family:

– Canon 5D Mk2
– Canon 24-105L
– Zeiss 35mm
– Zeiss 50mm
– Zeiss 21mm
– Canon 430EX
– Filters
– Ipad

I had on hand – other than for wildlife photography – a lens for most occasions: landscape, portrait (the 24-105 was pretty good for this), walk around, architectural. All were catered for with some of the best glass that money can buy along with a fantastic body incorporating the a full frame sensor in the shape of the 5D Mk2.

What was not to like? Well, as I have mentioned in previous a blog, the biggest downside was the weight and bulk.

We would regularly take two trips to Canada and the States each year and from where we live this would invariably involve two or three flights. This big bag of camera gear had to be lugged on and off various aircraft with three tired children to manage and cajole with their assorted paraphernalia.

And then it got to the point where I didn’t want to carry this bag with me at all and so the decision was made was to downsize but get the best “small” camera I could that would rival the 5D’s full frame sensor and the quality of the Zeiss optics.

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The M9 followed the 5D Mk2

The way to go? Leica (of course!). So I assembled a system around the Leica M9 with a 50mm Summicron, 35mm Summarit and 24mm Elmar. This little lot in small Billingham bag came to around half of the weight of the Canon/Zeiss kit in a much smaller bag. Oh and probably cost around twice as much! initial review of this camera is here: http://wp.me/p1hetB-as

I used the M9 for around 6 months. From an image quality perspective I will still say that in the right conditions it gave me the best “look” I have ever had from my photographs. Sharpness, contrast and colour were all superb. The Leica glass really lived up to it’s legendary reputation.

The M9 with it’s quirks – average sensor, poor screen, poor high ISO to name a few – was fun to use and really reconnected me with photography. It slowed me down and made me think a little more about shots.

But then the frustrations started. Whilst the size of the camera and the associated lenses meant I could take it anywhere I realised that I was missing more shots than I was getting. As I said above the majority of my photography takes place whilst vacationing with the family. It is one thing taking your time for a landscape shot but quite another taking pictures of the children playing, running or even moving.

Also, If the light wasn’t right getting focus was a pain using the rangefinder.

Also, when changing lenses the M9 seemed to attract more dust and dirt on the sensor than any other camera I had owned (it doesn’t have any form of dust reduction system) and post processing to remove the spots and splotches was becoming a chore.

So, despite the superb image quality and lightweight yet another system’s flaws start to outweigh the benefits……

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Fuji X-E1 and 18-55 Lens

And so the M9 went and the 5D Mk3 was ushered in with history quickly repeating itself over size and weight. Eventually it was replaced by the Fujifilm X-E1 and 18-55 lens a review of which can be read here: http://wp.me/p1hetB-eY

The system fit the bill in terms of size and weight and now, owning one camera with one lens (albeit a zoom lens which offers a degree of flexibility) I am liberated.

Everything is simplified. No longer is there a requirement to consider which lens for which shot. With the Fuji 18-55 ( 27-82mm 35mm equivalent) lens, I have found is good enough for 99% of the situations I find myself in and the images I want to capture. From landscapes to portraits to cityscapes I have never felt short changed.

Admittedly it is not appropriate for sports or wildlife but for most other situations it is fantastic.

No more worry about dust or dirt on the sensor. Not happy with the field of view? Be more creative and find an interesting new one.

The other issue I had with all the lenses I used to own is that I was always looking for the next one to buy. One that could fit into a small segment of photography be it macro, portrait, wildlife, super wide angle etc. GAS (Gear Acquisition Syndrome) is a very expensive condition that always makes you feel as though you need that next fix, err lens.

Now I am happy with the one lens – if it doesn’t do exactly what I want I consider a way round it. I have enjoyed photography more than ever and for me, the sheer enjoy,eat of capturing an image you are later proud of, is what it is all about.

Sigma DP1x – A Pocket Imaging Marvel?

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Sigma DP1x

I recently came across this camera for an extremely affordable price and decided, based on its almost cult status being capable of capturing superb images, to snap it up (sorry for the pun).

I was interested in discovering if it produced the kind of world class images it was purported to be capable of and also whether the frustrating elements of the camera – slow to operate, slow write times, slow autofocus and write to card, poor high iso performance, average build – were accurate.

To cut to the chase I can confirm that the images the camera produces really are superb with wonderful colour and sharpness. The 3 layer Foveon sensor – a Google search will provide a ton of information on the technical aspects if this device – is a significant departure from those used by the competition.

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The DP1x captures colours nicely

The comments that it is close to a film camera in the way it resolves colours and more importantly the visual feel are, I feel, accurate. This performance coupled with the super sharp fixed 28mm (equivalent) lens means that its output exceeds that of my Fuji X-E1 and 18-55 lens which is no slouch in these areas.

But there is I am afraid a “however”. There usually is but the caveats to this camera producing  the kind of images that when you get them on your computer screen make you go “wow” are as long as your arm.

Get the camera in the right conditions and you will be amazed. And by right conditions I mean generally outside, on a bright day (without any sun on the screen as the preview fades dramatically in bright light), with low iso (200 or less), on a static subject and ideally with manual focus to get things just so. Oh and a tripod would probably help as there is no inbuilt image stabilisation.

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Nice detail from the fixed lens/sensor combination

As stated previously if you can comply with virtually ALL of the above (maybe forgo the tripod if you can get your shutter speed up) then you will be richly rewarded with images that have a quality I think you would struggle to achieve with anything up to a Canon 5D Mk3. Not print as big as the side of a house quality but up to A3’ish with some tweaking kind of quality (and yes I have owned a 5D Mk3 and I am fully aware of the files it produces).

As for the build quality. It feels fairly solid but strangely light to me. Build quality is certainly not going to blow you away. It feels no better than a £200 point and shoot from the likes of Canon or Nikon and as the camera’s original retail price was around £600 then I think it will leave many disappointed.

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I feel it handles this scene well

Operationally it is very straightforward which makes a refreshing change with a mode dial on top for “P, A, S, M” shooting, set up, video and voice recording (!?). The remainder of the settings are fairly simply laid out after pressing the menu or quick menu buttons on the back of the camera although these have their own quirks that have to be experienced to be believed.

So who would the camera be good for? I would suggest landscape and architectural photographers that want to produce world class, fine art prints sized A3 or smaller. Forget portrait photography primarily because the focal length does not lend itself to this type of photography. In fact I would forget any other type of photography other than the ones mentioned previously.

Incidentally, forget the video capabilities of the camera – I am at a loss as to why Sigma even bothered given the performance here.

I would love to try out the new Merrill DP cameras out to see if any of the niggles have been ironed out. Until then I will be moving the DP1x on as, for me, its quirks just about outweigh the positives.

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Colours are still good in overcast conditions

Format FOVEON X3® Direct Image Sensor (CMOS)
Image Sensor Size 20.7×13.8mm (0.8 inch×0.5 inch)
Number of Pixels Effective Pixels 14.06MP (2652×1768×3 layers)
Aspect Ratio 3:2
Focal Length 16.6mm F4 (35mm equivalent focal length: 28mm)
Lens Construction 5 Groups, 6 Elements
Shooting Range 30cm–∞ (Full Mode),50cm–∞
Storage Media SD Card/Compatible with SDHC,Multi Media Card
Recording Format Exif2.21, DCF2.0, DPOF
Recording Mode Lossless compression RAW data (12-bit), JPEG(High, Wide, Medium, Low), Movie (AVI), Voice memo to still image (10 sec./30 sec.), Voice recording (WAV)
File Size (Number of Pixels)
For Still Images
RAW High Approx. 15.4MB (2640×1760)
JPEG High Fine Approx. 3.3MB (2640×1760)
Normal Approx. 1.9MB (2640×1760)
Basic Approx. 1.4MB (2640×1760)
Wide Fine Approx. 2.7MB (2640×1485)
Normal Approx. 1.6MB (2640×1485)
Basic Approx. 1.2MB (2640×1485)
Medium Fine Approx. 1.6MB (1872×1248)
Normal Approx. 0.9MB (1872×1248)
Basic Approx. 0.7MB (1872×1248)
Low Fine Approx. 0.8MB (1312× 880)
Normal Approx. 0.5MB (1312× 880)
Basic Approx. 0.3MB (1312× 880)
File Size/Movie QVGA:320×240 (30 Frames Per Second), Approximately 30minutes is possible with a 1GB SD Card.
White Balance 8 types (Auto, Sunlight, Shade, Overcast, Incandescent, Fluorescent, Flash, Custom)
ISO Sensitivity AUTO (ISO 100–ISO 200): With Flash (ISO 100–ISO 400) ,ISO 50, ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800, (ISO 1600– 3200 in Raw mode only)
Color Mode 7 types (Standard, Vivid, Neutral, Portrait, Landscape, B&W, Sepia)
Auto Focus Type Contrast Detection Type
AF Point Selection Selection of 1point from 9points
Focus Lock Shutter release halfway-down position (From Menu Settings AE Lock is possible by AE lock button)
Manual Focus Dial Type
Shutter Type Electronically controlled lens shutter
Shutter Speed 1/2000sec to 15sec: The maximum shutter speed is varied depending on F value.
Metering System TTL Full Aperture Metering [1]Evaluative Metering, [2]Center Weighted Average Metering, [3]Spot Metering
Exposure Control System [P]Program AE, [S]Shutter Priority AE, [A]Aperture Priority AE, [M] Manual
Exposure Compensation 1/3 EV Steps up to±3EV for Appropriate Exposure
Auto Bracketing 3 pictures in appropriate, under and over exposure levels. It can be set in 1/3EV stop increments up to ±3EV.
Built-in Flash Pop-up (Manual)
Guide Number 6(ISO100/m)
Built-in Flash Coverage Range 30cm to 2.1m (ISO200)
External Flash Hot shoe (X Sync. Contact, dedicated contacts)
Drive Modes [1]Single, [2]Continuous (3 Frames/second), [3]Self Timer (2sec./10sec.)
LCD Monitor Type TFT Color LCD Monitor
Monitor Size and Pixels 2.5inches / Approx. 230,000 dots
LCD Monitor Language English/Japanese/German/French/Spanish/Italian/Chinese (Simplified)/ Korean/ Russian
Interfaces USB (USB2.0), Video Out (NTSC/PAL),Audio Out (Monaural)
Power Dedicated Li-ion Battery BP-31, Battery Charger BC-31, AC Adapter (Optional)
Battery Life Approx.250 shots(25℃)
Dimensions 113.3mm/4.5″(W)×59.5mm/2.3″(H)×50.3mm/2″(D)
Weight 250g/ 8.8oz. (excluding batteries and card)
DP1x Accessories Li-ion Battery BP-31, Battery Charger BC-31, Lens Cap LCP-11, Neck Strap NS-11, Soft Case CS-70, Hot Shoe Cover HSC-11, USB Cable, Video Cable, SIGMA Photo Pro Disc, Instruction Manual

Ticino Pilot Watch – High Specification Watch for a Bargain Price

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Ticino 44mm Pilot Watch

I did a lot of research before I purchased the Ticino Pilots’s watch and had a fairly strict set of criteria of what I wanted from my new watch:

  • German WWII Aviator Styling
  • Sub 44mm case size
  • Automatic or hand wind movement
  • Stainless steel case
  • Sapphire glass
  • Anti-reflective coating
  • See through back
  • Leather Strap
  • Must be sub £150.

This was quite a tall order I felt and was surprised, after some digging around forum sites, that I came across the Ticino on eBay. From a specification standpoint it ticked all the boxes. The movement is a Seagull TY3600-2B hand wind movement.

I could only find one or two decent reviews of the branch which suggested that it was a good not necessarily great timepiece. In view of the fantastic price I decided to pull the trigger on eBay and after around 4 days for the watch to arrive in the UK from the US and a few days in customs I eventually collected the package from the post office around 2 months ago and have been wearing it daily since.

I have to say that my expectations were fairly low when I got the watch and I have to say that I have been more that pleasantly surprised.

Overall the watch seems really well put together with a nice heft to the casework, fantastic sapphire glass, a nice relatively uncluttered face and a nice view of the movement on the back. The strap, despite other comments is pretty decent too. It is stiff when first worn but it is better and more pliable a couple of months down the line.

It also keeps time as well if not better than any of the other mechanical watches I have owned from Seiko to Omega to Rolex. I have not done any specific tests to be able to provide a +/- figure (I haven’t the time or the inclination to do this) but when checking the time against my phone it always seems spot on.

Downsides? Well only one. The lume. Despite what the spec suggests (C1 Superluminova) this is not the best and very quickly loses it’s charge over half an hour or so. You also have to hold it under a bright light to give it a good charge. This is far from a deal breaker but if this is important to you worth bearing in mind.

All in all I am very, very happy with this watch. It looks and feels the part and for the money it is a stone cold bargain. I have shown it to a few friend and family and asked them to guess the price. Each one said they thought I had paid around £500+ for the watch. When I told them the actual price they were stunned.

I would love to try the Chronograph now. That looks like another great timepiece.

If you are in the market for a highly specified, superbly built watch you would have to spend a great deal more, I feel, to better this.

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